Scotland as an Independent Small State: Where would it seek shelter?

Authors

  • Alyson J.K. Bailes
  • Baldur Þórhallsson
  • Rachael Lorna Johnstone

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.13177/irpa.a.2013.9.1.1

Keywords:

Scotland, independence, small states, strategy, shelter, European institutions, Nordic affairs, Arctic.

Abstract

A planned referendum in 2014 on Scottish independence gives cause to examine that scenario in the light of small state studies and recent European experience. One of the best-supported assumptions in small state literature is that small countries need to form alliances and seek protection from larger neighboring states and/or international institutions. Small European states have generally sought shelter from the European Union (EU) and NATO. This study confirms that an independent Scotland would need strategic, political, economic and societal shelter, and could look for the various elements within existing European institutions, from its closest southern and northern neightbours, and from the US. However, protection may come with a certain cost - just as union with another entity does at present.

Author Biographies

Alyson J.K. Bailes

Adjunct Professor of Political Science, University of Iceland.

Baldur Þórhallsson

Professor of Political Science, University of Iceland.

Rachael Lorna Johnstone

Senior Lecturer in Law, University of Akureyri.

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Published

2013-06-15

How to Cite

Bailes, A. J., Þórhallsson, B., & Johnstone, R. L. (2013). Scotland as an Independent Small State: Where would it seek shelter?. Icelandic Review of Politics & Administration, 9(1), 1–20. https://doi.org/10.13177/irpa.a.2013.9.1.1

Issue

Section

Peer Reviewed Articles

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